Mountain-Hunting Nutrition

by Adam Foss

 

Whether it’s too much, too little or not the correct food, it’s been a long road to dial in the exact kind and amount of fuel my body needs for 20 straight days in the mountains. This is the hardest lesson I’ve learned in the field, and I hope you don’t have to.

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There are plenty of high quality, organic and nutritious foods geared towards active outdoorsmen and women. I don’t mind carrying a little extra high-quality fuel, so I can try to take in small snacks consistently throughout the day. A good rule of thumb is that if doesn’t contain 160 calories/oz., leave it at home. Of course, every rule is meant to be broken, which comes to be true in the form of freeze fried meals or quick burning items like Clif Shot Blocks. I’m happy to make that sacrifice, as a warm meal at the end of a hard day, or a quick boost of energy can become well worth it.

Hydration is just as critical as proper fuel, if not more. I prefer using electrolyte supplements like Nuun tablets in my water bottle. I also drink lots of tea, and have found it improves all aspects - both physical and mental - of a hunt.

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Included is all the food I’d bring for one full day in the mountains. For extended trips, I’d simply multiply all food items by the number of expected days.

1. Mountain House Freeze Dried Meal
2. Clif Shot Block
3. Oatmeal
4. Pro Bar Meal Replacement Bar
5. Cup-a-Soup
6. Clif Shot Gel
7. Justin’s Peanut Butter
8. Clif Mojo Bar
9. Nuun Active Hydration Tablets
10. Honey Stinger Organic Honey Waffle
11. Emergen-C Dietary Supplement
12. Tea bag
13. Starbucks Via Instant Coffee

"A good rule of thumb is that if it doesn't contain 160 calories/oz., leave it at home." — "Hydration is just as critical as proper fuel, if not more. I prefer using electrolyte supplements like nuun tablets in my water bottle."



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